Dermatologic System

Overview: The Dermatologic System & Biomunity™

The gut microbiota communicates with the skin as one of the main regulators in the gut-skin axis. [1] This link affects skin homeostasis and has a direct influence on modulating immune response. Gut bacterial dysbiosis is associated with chronic inflammatory disorders of the skin, such as psoriasis [2], and can influence various dermatological diseases, including acne, rosacea, and atopic dermatitis. [3] Probiotics can aid in the treatment and prevention of skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, chronic wounds, and cutaneous neoplasms. [4]

 

Biomunity Can Help

The microbiome can be considered an effective therapeutic target for treating chronic skin disorders as well as episodic blemishes influenced by inflammation.  Modulation of the gut microbiota seems to be a feasible approach to improve skin conditions.  Probiotics in Biomunity act in the gut microbiome to support the body’s own system for modulating immune response, including inflammation of the derma layer. Meanwhile, the benefits of vitamins D3 and C to healthy skin, for enhancing the integrity,  function, appearance of the skin, have been well documented for decades.

Biomunity™ promotes dermatologic health through modulation of the gut microbiota, as dysbiosis is associated with inflammatory skin diseases

The Science

The gut microbiome has the ability to affect distant organ systems, including the skin.  The link between gut microbiota and the skin affects skin homeostasis and influences the modulation of the cutaneous immune response.  There is also an association between gut bacterial dysbiosis and chronic inflammatory skin disorders.  Probiotics might be useful in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, such as psoriasis, by modulating microbiome communities.

Alesa DI, Alshamrani HM, Alzahrani YA, Alamssi DN, Alzahrani NS, Almohammadi ME. The role of gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and the therapeutic effects of probiotics. J Family Med Prim Care. 2019 Nov 15;8(11):3496-3503. doi: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_709_19. PMID: 31803643; PMCID: PMC6881942.  

There is a relationship between the gut and skin microbiome and various dermatological diseases, including acne, psoriasis, rosacea, and atopic dermatitis.  Current evidence suggests that it is likely due to a combination of neurologic and immunologic responses to environmental shifts, resulting in chronic systemic inflammation that can ultimately effect the skin.

Ellis SR, Mguyen M, Vaughn AR, Notay M, Burney WA, Sandhu S, Sivamani RK. The Skin and Gut Microbiome and Its Role in Common Dermatologic Conditions.   Microorganisms.  2019 Nov 11; 7(11): 550 PMC [article] PMCID: PMC6920876 PMID: DOI: 10.3390/microorganisms7110550 

Specific Ingredients that Help

Lactobacillus plantarum can decrease dermal inflammation and promote recovery in the immune system after UV exposure, resulting in a decrease in laxity and fine wrinkling of the skin.  L. plantarum also improves skin hydration and has anti-photoaging effects, reducing wrinkle depth and improving skin gloss and elasticity. [5][6]

 

Lactobacillus reuteri has been associated with an increase in subcuticular folliculogenesis, and has been shown to elicit more shiny, lustrous hair.  A form of inflammation can subvert scalp hair growth, but L. reuteri can help to inhibit this effect and improve hair thickness. [5][7]

 

Zinc ascorbate inhibits the growth of S. aureus (a germ that can cause a variety of skin infections), and may be useful as an anti-acne agent. [8]

 

Vitamin C can ameliorate signs of aging in the human skin.  Supplying vitamin C to the skin greatly assists wound healing and minimizes raised scar formation. [9]

 

CoQ10, an anti-oxidative agent, was shown to suppress hair cell death induced by Aminoglycosides (a class of antibiotics).  CoQ10 suppresses hair cell death induced by neomycin (an antibiotic) by inhibiting production of 4-HNE, the metabolite of the hydroxy radical. [10]

 

Vitamin D3 plays an important role in skin health, and vitamin D deficiency has been associated with many dermatological diseases. [11]

References:

  1. Salem I, Ramser A, Isham N, Ghannoum MA. The Gut Microbiome as a Major Regulator of the Gut-Skin Axis. Front Microbiol. 2018 Jul 10;9:1459. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.01459. PMID: 30042740; PMCID: PMC6048199.
  2. Alesa DI, Alshamrani HM, Alzahrani YA, Alamssi DN, Alzahrani NS, Almohammadi ME. The role of gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and the therapeutic effects of probiotics. J Family Med Prim Care. 2019 Nov 15;8(11):3496-3503. doi: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_709_19. PMID: 31803643; PMCID: PMC6881942.
  3. Ellis SR, Mguyen M, Vaughn AR, Notay M, Burney WA, Sandhu S, Sivamani RK. The Skin and Gut Microbiome and Its Role in Common Dermatologic Conditions.   Microorganisms.  2019 Nov 11; 7(11): 550 PMC [article] PMCID: PMC6920876 PMID: DOI: 10.3390/microorganisms7110550
  4. Yu Y, Dunaway S, Champer J, Kim J, Alikhan A. Changing our microbiome: probiotics in dermatology. Br J Dermatol. 2020 Jan;182(1):39-46. doi: 10.1111/bjd.18088. Epub 2019 Jul 28. PMID: 31049923.
  5. Sharma D, Kober MM, Bowe WP. Anti-Aging Effects of Probiotics. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016 Jan;15(1):9-12. PMID: 26741377.
  6. Lee DE, Huh CS, Ra J, Choi ID, Jeong JW, Kim SH, Ryu JH, Seo YK, Koh JS, Lee JH, Sim JH, Ahn YT. Clinical Evidence of Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum HY7714 on Skin Aging: A Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study. J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2015 Dec 28;25(12):2160-8. doi: 10.4014/jmb.1509.09021. PMID: 26428734. 
  7. Levkovich T, Poutahidis T, Smillie C, Varian BJ, Ibrahim YM, Lakritz JR, et al. (2013) Probiotic Bacteria Induce a ‘Glow of Health’. PLoS ONE 8(1): e53867. 
  8. Iinuma K, Tsuboi I. Zinc ascorbate has superoxide dismutase-like activity and in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2012;5:135-40. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S36214. Epub 2012 Sep 17. PMID: 23055762; PMCID: PMC3459546. 
  9. Pullar JM, Carr AC, Vissers MCM. The Roles of Vitamin C in Skin Health. Nutrients. 2017; 9(8):866. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9080866
  10. Sugahara K, Hirose Y, Mikuriya T, Hashimoto M, Kanagawa E, Hara H, Shimogori H, Yamashita H. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside. PLoS One. 2014 Sep 29;9(9):e108280. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0108280. PMID: 25265538; PMCID: PMC4180734.
  11. Mostafa WZ, Hegazy RA. Vitamin D and the skin: Focus on a complex relationship: A review. J Adv Res. 2015;6(6):793-804. doi:10.1016/j.jare.2014.01.011